Sci-Fi Scenes: To the Moon, 2001: ASO, 1968

2001 is 45 years old. Almost two generations have been born since it appeared in theaters and took viewers on a total mind trip. People still debate the meaning of the movie, and the movie has many memorable scenes.

For this viewer the most memorable was the voiceless PanAm shuttle flight to Clavius Base set to the music of Johann Strauss, specifically his waltz Blue Danube. It’s fitting that Kubrick picked a waltz to go with this segment, because it truly is a beautifully visualized dance never before seen on the screen. The other reason the scene is so amazing is the jarring segue between primitive man being uplifted by the obelisk and advanced man moving in to space . . . the segue visualized by a bone thrown in to the sky.

The movie was released at the height of the space race and Kubrick ensured that the space sequences were as realistic as possible. The effects in 2001, and this segment in particular, are still on par with what you see today. It may even be argued that they are better because they are practical effects as opposed to those often represented by lifeless looking CGI.

Let’s dance.

What is a Sci-Fi Scene? These scenes are memorable because they touch the soul, show amazing visions of the future, or broke ground in film technology. All these scenes are so great that they are in no particular order, just the order that they come to me. Enjoy!

About Neal Ulen

Neal Ulen
Editor/Webmaster - Neal is a writer and recovering engineer who likes pizza, the insidious power of sarcasm (and pizza), and debating science fiction (and pizza). You can also find his writing on Omni, Geeks, and other media platforms.